Nine Point Circle

Opus 6: Nine Point Circle

“Opus 6: Nine Point Circle!. There is no circle in this image but it was created because of a shearing effect determined by two of the points in “the Nine Point Circle” that can be found in every triangle.

Nine Point Circle

There is no circle visible in this work but the shearing of the triangle was made using two of the points from the nine point circle.

The Circle Explanation:

The nine point circle is a mathematical phenomenon sometimes referred to as Feuerbach’s Circle, Euler’s circle, Terquem’s circle. Every Triangle has within it and through it a nine point circle.

The nine-point circle is a circle that can be constructed for any given triangle. It is so named because it passes through nine significant concyclic points defined from the triangle. These nine points are:

  • The midpoint of each side of the triangle.
  • The foot of each altitude.
  • The midpoint of the line segment from each vertex of the triangle to the orthocenter (where the three altitudes meet; these line segments lie on their respective altitudes).200px-Triangle.NinePointCircle.svg

                     Feuerbach’s Circle

Not being a mathematician that’s the best I can do with the technical explanation. The  following are my thoughts on making the work.

My thoughts that gave birth to the work:

“The cradle rocks above an abyss, and common sense tells us that our existence is but a brief crack of light between two extremities of darkness” this is the opening sentence from Vladimir Nabokov‘s book “Speak, Memory”.

Two paradox’s of my comprehension gave birth to this work and others in the “Opus” series. The first is the idea that the infinite behind me is the same as the infinite in front of me as I move from one to the other and the second is that as some scientists think time did not exist before the “Big Bang”, although theories change all the time. No pun intended!

The two extremities of darkness for me are both infinite, and the small crack of light that is my life I am moving through, so the infinity behind me should be getting bigger and the one in front of me smaller but I am told that the infinite is always the same so can the one behind me remains the same as I get further away from it, no matter how miniscule in the universal eternity that may be.

I am vaguely aware that some scientists say before the “Big Bang” time did not exist but I can’t comprehend that, before the “Big Bang” the entire matter that makes up the universe was supposedly the size of a pea, and in my mind no matter how small anything is it needs space to exist and if it exists there must be duration and so there was always what I would consider time.

Now at this stage many scientist’s and cosmologist’s will be tearing their hair out at my ramblings but these thought whether right or wrong give rise to my thoughts and imaginings and the universe is realized through the thoughts and imaginings of  humanity.

These paradox made me wonder therefore if the “Nine Point Circle” existed before the Big Bang or was the theoretical phenomenon of life born with the physical. In my mind they must always have existed, but then my mind doesn’t half come up with some strange and wild imaginings every now and then, so reader beware!

So here is the simple premise for the work, I created a random triangle which can still be seen, created the nine point circle and using two of the nine points sheared the triangle on those points and then moving out created the pattern which  I then painted. The spacing and colour in the work apart from the shearing distance are completely intuitive and so that aspect of the work mirrors the idea of the universe being imagined by humanity, whilst the pattern is the creation of something that has always existed  imagined by myself.

This is My Life 2017 “Projections”

This is My Life 2017 “Projections ” Exhibition opens at the Embassy Theatre this week.  The portraits were created by the students of Linkage Community Trust using digital projections and traditional painting techniques. There are 19 portraits in the exhibition and the work can be seen until the end of August.

It was a pleasure to work with the students and staff at the Spilsby Unit.

           

This is My Life, an exploration of barriers.

This is My Life, an art exhibition and event at the Embassy Theatre Skegness, opening the 21st of September 2016.

Your Invitation:

Open invitation to the opening of the Art Exhibition "This is My Life"

Your open invitation to the opening of the Art Exhibition “This is My Life”

About: This is my life is an art exhibition and event which seeks to explore all aspects of disability through the eyes of those who struggle with various conditions. Our hope through the exhibition is to help those who struggle with various conditions to build a “wee” bridge from their side of the gap which makes it easier for us all to enjoy life within our community. To do this, two artists myself and Jason Wilsher-Mills have been working with various groups to help people to create images and texts which reflect how they feel about their lives or there place in the community. This includes the family and friends of those living with the condition as they are also affected by circumstances. The work created in theses workshops will be shown at the Embassy Theatre Gallery alongside work by six prominent disabled artists in the exhibition “This is my Life”. The exhibition work of the six artists is curated by Shape Arts, a national organisation which promotes artists living with various disabilities. Sometimes within a system people talk to you, make notes, record details, which are important to create programs to help but it can seem that although you have been heard, no one is listening. This exhibition seeks to reintroduce the personal human experience back into the conversation. Some of the work may not seem profound in its imagery; the profundity is born in the maker how the work is made and the memories the image records.

What: The Exhibition of work will run from the 21st of September until the 12th of November and will be opened on the 21st of September at 2.00pm with a large digital projection of the work created in the workshops with Jason Wilsher-Mills, after the digital projection which will last approximately twenty minutes there will be a new performance work by the students of Linkage supported by Rhubarb Theatre which will last again approximately twenty minutes. After this Jason Wilsher-Mills will give a brief talk on the Disability Discrimination Act banner that he was commissioned to make for the Houses of Parliament where it is on permanent exhibition, a second copy of the banner will be on show during the exhibition.

The exhibition will then be officially opened.

Participants. The six artists in the exhibition are artists, Simon Raven, Jason Wilsher-Mills, Rachel Gadsden, Tom Shakespeare, Brigitte Mierau and Natalie Papamichael, who all face challenges

through various disabilities. (Individual artists details are given in the additional information notes). Alongside the work of these artists will be work created by students from Linkage working with Jason Wilsher-Mills and work created by sufferers and supporters from Lincolnshire’s Alzheimer’s Society Dementia Cafes and other groups working with artist Malcolm Tait.

The event has been generously funded by Arts Council England with strong support from Magna Vitae and The Embassy Theatre Skegness. Also crucial in producing this first event is Shape Arts who curated the exhibition and Rhubarb Theatre who supported the creation of the new performance work.

To view some of the work that will be on show at the exhibition go to our sister blog https://thisismylife.live/

See you there 🙂

 

The Kindness of Strangers

The Kindness of Strangers

The Kindness of Strangers

This work began life as a piece about place, there was two reasons for this. Firstly a curiosity about the influence place has on who we are and secondly the object that started the piece was a holder for a mobile phone to use it as a Sat Nav., it turns out I didn’t need it.

So the work is about my journey, all the places I have been to that are prominent in my memory. It is like life is a mechanism that has been churning out events and circumstances I have responded to and they have influence the places I have gone to or lived in.

However the more I got into the piece I discovered that the places that most readily came to mind were places where I remember meeting someone who influenced me, and so on the back of some of the place name in the glass bowl is a record of who that person was. The one that springs most readily to my mind frequently even today after about fifteen years was a meeting with a priest in Padua, Italy.

I was visiting Venice and on a day trip to Padua to look at the paintings in one of its famous churches saw that there was notices everywhere to say there was no photography permitted. Not a problem I enjoyed the paintings and in the afternoon went to view some paintings in another church. I was walking round the church with my camera hanging around my neck and this priest came up to me pointing at the camera, I hastily babbled “Non” “Non” which the sophisticated amongst you will realize is French, the only two Italian words I knew were “Si” and “grazie”. Anyway I kept trying to make this priest understand I was not taking photographs, without much success because he kept going on at me, he obviously did not speak English, and I did not have a phrase book. This seemed to go on for a long period which was probably only about seven or eight minute but when you seem to be at loggerheads with someone it is a long time. Anyway after the said eight minutes in desperation the priest took my camera in his hand and proceeded to take photographs saying Si Si! At last the penny dropped and what he had been trying to tell me for the past eight minutes was that it was OK to take photographs in this church. What struck me was that having decided to do me a kindness despite the language barrier and my lack of common sense he persevered until I understood, most would have given up after about a minute. Such a small kindness but always remembered.

About two and a half years ago I was diagnosed with something called Pulmonary Fibrosis (it has a broad range of outcomes) and so the timepiece is indicative of the finite time we all have. But what I realized making the work is how little towns, countries and places influenced me and how much people have.

Other views can be found in Gallery 5: Making and Assemblage

Archimedean Spiral

Spiral

I have always been fascinated by the relationship between the precise formulae  that exist in the abstract world of mathematics and the imprecise way they translate into the natural or real world.

The spiral this image is based on can be described by the equation     is named after  the 3rd century Greek Mathematician Archimedes.

The original line for the spiral is taken from an exact computer linear drawing of the spiral but as I widened it to a central ball, the precision is lost as I create the image by hand. The sections in the image like the central ball are simply creative and intuitive processes as I build the image.

I wanted to incorporate natural spirals into the piece so as I live near the beach decided to use shell found on Anderby Creek beach. The work is framed in wood from an old palette which has been sanded down and waxed. The idea on how to incorporate the shells into the work comes from a Jasper John work  which has a target as the main image but four small cast heads are incorporated into the top of a similar frame structure.

 

All Things Pass

All Things Pass An assemblage of found and bought objects, (61cm x 45cm x 45cm)

All Things Pass
An assemblage of found and bought objects, (61cm x 45cm x 45cm)

The Beginning

All my small assemblages start with a single object I find and what is on my mind at that time, the found object that inspired this piece is not in it , as it progressed it seemed to take something away from the emotional response I have to a piece of work as it grows.

This is the original object:

The missing object

The missing object

The piece was originally going to be suspended by being held by the sixteen threads that form the conical shape coming from the mast, the holes I drill in the piece can be seen in the object, my creative process never seems to follow a linear path and as I worked on the piece it became less and less relevant but it is the original object which inspired the conical shaped thread format.

About the piece:

I was reading a poem All things Pass by Lao-Tzu (6th Century BC, from translations adapted by Timothy Leary) about the time that I found the object,

All Things Pass.

All things pass
A sunrise does not last all morning
All things pass
A cloudburst does not last all day
All things pass
Nor a sunset all night
All things pass
What always changes?

Earth ….sky…. thunder….
mountain ….. water…..
wind ….. fire….. lake…..

These change
And if these do not last

Do man’s visions last?
Do man’s illusions

Take things as they come

All things pass.
About the work:

The main premise for this work is the idea that I see in the future possible options the sixteen threads pass through a Perspex barrier and reach three different destinations; I think I exert some influence on the possible futures I see for myself but influences outside my control frequently means I alter decisions and although I make those decisions it is the outside influence that has made me choose.

It is the juxtaposition between what I see as certainty within me and the vagaries of fate that in youth I challenged but now in later life seem to enjoy as I accept that “all things pass.”

 

The Objects:

The cream coloured plastic section which supprts the mast and rigging was found on Chapel St. Leonards beach when I found the original object.

The wooden steps to the plinth supporting the found plastic in made from driftwood found on Inch beach in Ireland. The same wood was used to make the ships skeleton which can be seen below the clock.

The Clock mechanism comes from a carriage clock that was a gift to my wife and myself by customers in a pub we used to run in the 1980’s.

The wood to which the winding handles are attached come from the shores of a loch in the north of Scotland.

All the other objects are bought.

Cathedrals

Cathedrals, (oil on paper bonded to fibreboard, 98cm x 110cm)

Cathedrals, (oil on paper bonded to fibreboard, 98cm x 110cm)

“Man is what he believes.” ― Anton Chekhov

Cathedral definition: the largest and most important church in the diocese, from Latin cathedra “seat”.

I have a cathedral; it is the seat of my views, my view of the world, and my interpretation of existence. The lesser churches within the diocese can present conflicting viewpoints, the Cathedral endeavours to provide a sense of entity, of oneness from these disparate elements.

I used to think that truths and ideals that form my cathedral were solid definable elements that engage to form a single whole; some contemporary philosophers dispute the existence of the “self”. I can understand that view because knowledge, learning, place, mood, circumstances and relationships, or changes within these deny me definable edges to the various ideals and belief that are my cathedral.

It is the paradox of the certainty and oneness I feel and the uncertainty of the views that form that certainty that was the primary driver in the making of this work.